News and blog posts from our students and faculty

Testing Timelines

Friday, January 31st, 2014 | Posted by James Lewis

Preface: I’m in a group with Meghan Corbett and Anna Krachey researching experiences around birth and labor & delivery. This post is the second in a series of updates on developing a product to serve pregnant women. You can read last week’s post here.

Last week our group worked on a timeline exercise tracking how women view milestones in their pregnancy – things like telling their best friends, notifying their job or certain medical appointments – rather than thinking just in terms of trimesters. We looked at each step and evaluated the value proposition, emotional value proposition and incentive / motivations for a woman using our app at each of her milestones.

The milestones we came up with were:

  • I’m Pregnant!
  • I’m Telling People (Close Family and Friends)
  • I’m Telling My Boss
  • Formalizing Plans
  • Labor & Delivery
  • I Have a Baby!

Using these milestones, we came up with a timeline exercise. We wanted to make sure we were thinking about these milestones, and how those events affect sharing information, the same way pregnant women were. In it, we asked women to map out:

  • Milestones during their pregnancy
  • When they told their best friends, their parents, and the rest of their social circle
  • When they informed their jobs, clients or anyone else dependent on them that they were pregnant.

We tried to keep things pretty open so women could make it their own. In addition to marking milestones, one participant also indicated her levels of stress regarding her pregnancy and how that related to what was going on in her life.

This week we spoke with a first time pregnant woman, a woman pregnant with her second child as well as a Doula. Our concept of milestones appeared to be correct. Yay!

During this time one of our participants shared an email she sent out to her family and close friends. She was planning a homebirth, and her email laid out what she wanted everyone to do, how to communicate with her and how they could help. Such gems included:

“Please resist any urges to bring things to the house, such as food or drinks, during labor. I may be very sensitive to smells and we also need to keep all of our space clean and clear.”

and

“[My husband] will be communicating to people if anything changes and we ask that feelings be spared if changes on the day affect you.”

This participant was clearly able to set boundaries and expectations so that she could get what she needed and her family felt like part of the team – even if they weren’t there. We realized, however, that many women may not be able to do this or even think to do it, and speaking with our Doula confirmed this. During our initial research phase we heard:

“I’m just going to go to the Hospital and see what happens.”

We wanted to come up with a system to set these boundaries and parameters, so that women could start mentally preparing as well as focus on their birth. We heard anxiety from some of our research participants like:

“My parents want so much to be helpful, but my father is obese and my mother has cancer. It becomes more about me managing them instead of them being helpful.”

The tests I wrote about earlier, as well at the email I just shared along with many sentiments about pregnant women dealing with family members resulted in our current design idea: InnerCircle – The Birth Plan for Everyone Else.

We’ll continue to develop and refine the idea, but here are the main premises:

  1. Women share different information with different people about their pregnancy. They need a way to manage all that information and the complex relationships surrounding it.
  2. Women also need a way to plan and articulate what they would like their family and friends to do during her labor & delivery. They shouldn’t have to worry about keeping their mother-in-law happy while they are trying to give birth to a baby!

We are currently doing user tests where we will validate these ideas and see how women to respond to writing out directions for those around them. We’ve also come up with a paper prototype test where we’ll have women create circles of people around them in the same way we are planning to do it in our app. We want to see how women pick and choose whom to put in their inner circle – those who are closer and get more information – and those they put in their outer one.

We are currently recruiting pregnant women and new mothers to help test our design idea. If you know of anyone who might be interested, please get in touch with me at james.lewis@austincenterfordesign.com

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