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Testing Our Concept through Scenario Validation

Friday, February 14th, 2014 | Posted by meghan.corbett

When we last left off, we illustrated how we used the power of storytelling to elaborate on our design idea Inner Circle: the Birth Plan for Everyone Else— a smartphone app that guides expectant mothers through a series of questions regarding their impending birth, empowering them to have authority over their birth experience.

Over the weekend, our group tested some of the features of Inner Circle through a user-testing method called scenario validation. Scenario validation acts as a litmus test for whether the intended features and functions of our application are viewed as needed and useful by our intended audience. To do this, we create multiple short stories with accompanying visuals in which a fictional user would use our application to help solve a specific problem at a specific time. These sketches contained the minimal flows needed to communicate the feature in order to test the idea.

To validate the concepts, we held one group session with a total of 4 expectant and recent mothers, some who had hospital births, and some who had homebirths. We read aloud one scenario and had participants fill out questionnaires about each scenario. We then held a group discussion with participants about the features and usefulness of this tool and how they had perceived it.

As we expected, this type of concept validation proved to be invaluable. The feedback we received about the core concept was overwhelmingly positive:

“I think [Inner Circle] would be helpful for somebody with their first pregnancy. It seems to ask questions that I wouldn’t even think to ask. It feels like it really fills a void.”

“There’s something nice about having a birth plan for everyone else. It’s something that’s needed and I didn’t know that I needed it.”

“Every pregnant friend that I had, I would tell them, this would go into the package they need to prepare for their birth.”

Most importantly, scenario validation allowed us to see what features might need a clearer value proposition:

“I don’t think it would be that difficult to just send two different emails. I don’t know if I need an app to facilitate that for me.”

The discussion and feedback from participants informed us that a tool that creates communication hierarchy should be secondary to a tool that provocates the creation of a birth plan for friends and family.

This week, our team will be concentrating on constructing the wireframes which prompts the user to answer questions related to the planning of their birth–the location, people involved, communication boundaries, and tasks which need to be delegated. This feature will be complimented by the communication hierarchies which will disseminate information to the appropriate people–all people will receive opt-in links to tasks such as food prep whereas other people will also be able to volunteer to pick up an older child from school (inner circle only).

At the same time, we will be reviewing previously conducted research with mothers to make sure our design addresses the issues they wished they had known to prepare for. Our goal is to present this information in creating a birth plan for future mothers in their planning stages so that they know what to expect and will be feel more confident and assured entering into motherhood.

“This empowers you to be the boss lady, which is an important way to feel going into becoming a mother.”

Look for another update within the week. As always, if you have any thoughts about Inner Circle, please don’t hesitate to comment here or email me at meghan.corbett@ac4d.com.

 

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