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Understanding Our Inner Circle Application Through Context and HCI Design Theory

Monday, March 24th, 2014 | Posted by anna.krachey

Our design team is knee deep in piloting our design idea around pregnancy, labor and delivery called Inner Circle: The Birth Plan for Everyone Else.  You can read more about it here.  In Chris Risdon’s Theory class we started off the quarter reading about Human Centered Interaction (HCI) and context in which technology is used. Because we are in the process of thinking about designing the interactions within our product, and how context may affect its use, we wanted to apply the concepts that we learned from these readings to think about strengthening our own design.

We constructed a 2×2 axis based on how we understood each author’s perspective to relate our own Inner Circle concept and execution.   The x axis plots how closely each author’s view point on technology relates to our concept (doesn’t at all, or strongly relates). The y axis plots how we see each author’s perspective relating to the execution of Inner Circle (relates closely, doesn’t relate at all).

It was really important to our product to think about how technology inserts itself in our society and its relevance and impact on our culture because it is our objective for our product to serve as a bridge in communication and connection, and not a disconnector.

One of the most interesting author perspectives was that of Steve Mann, inventor of EyeTap, the predecessor of Google Glass.   Mann was insistent that the capability of a camera that records all viewer perspective experience would offload some of the mental ram needed to remember trivial things.  Mann hypothesized that this would allow us to retain that ram for more important memories and thought processing.  Our group really strongly considered this vantage, because we think of Inner Circle as being able to offload some of the mental ram that goes into worrying around organizing a birth.  ”Don’t forget to tell Martha to feed Phoebe when we head to the hospital to give birth” might bounce around in one’s head for months before the event arrives.  Using Inner Circle to send out a plan to everyone else informing them of the organization and plan around the birth would act as a way to clear an expectant mother’s mental plate, much in the way that Mann talks about not using mental ram to remember trivial details.  However, we also think that defaulting on committing something to memory is in a way defaulting on processing fully.  Leading pregnant women through creating reminders to send later and making decisions around their birth experience forces them to process these things.  At the same time, it releases some of the anxiety of having to remember these decisions when the time to focus on the labor at hand arrives.  This mapped to our agreeing with Mann on concept- in that we both agreed that the ability to offload mental energy could help one focus on more important things.  However, our execution of making pregnant women process decisions through the use of our app is directly the opposite of how we see Mann’s execution- that one could fully disengage from processing things with the thought that they could return to the footage later.

This is prime example of the process we used for dissecting each of the seven author’s theories relating to HCI and context in technology and then relating their point of view to our own design.   You can see the full 2×2 below.

We’re currently recruiting pregnant women for our pilot!  If you know anyone who would want to participate, send them to www.innercircleplan.com.  Thanks!

 

 


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