Roadmap v1

Making myAT&T Designs a Reality – Part 2, Roadmapping

Last week we looked at the first steps involved in turning our myAT&T mobile app redesign into a real working product. This included looking at technical capabilities and estimating how long it would take for each feature set, or flow, would take for a team of two developers to create. This week we will be looking at how a product manager (in this case, me) will use this information to thin-slice each screen, prioritize, and create a roadmap to bring the designs to life.

The designs were originally created as an ideal state, without time and resource constraints being a consideration. Now that we actually need a plan release cycles, less impactful features become less of a priority to be able to release updates to the app on a regular basis. We can get to a faster release cycle by thin slicing our designs.

Thin-slicing is the act of reviewing each screen and asking how necessary each individual control is on every screen. Next, you remove components that provide the user the last value in achieving their goal while still adding value to the user. This was difficult due to the fact that I had created these screens with intent for every design decision. It became my baby.

My strategy for thin-slicing was to make several passes of the screens and ask myself how necessary each control, or element on the screen, was important to the overall goal of the user. I combined this answer with the estimations from development, findings from heuristic and cognitive evaluations, think aloud protocol, and what would ultimately be most useful to the user. There was also a consideration of not cutting some features in the first release because they could be reused throughout the rest of the app. With a front loading of reusable components, you are able to get a more valuable product quicker to the user.

One example of this was an in-app notification, primarily indicating that a task has successfully been completed. This was something I added after my original design evaluations and after re-testing the feature it was very-well received among users. The ambiguity was gone. While this may have taken six days of a developers time during the release cycle, the framework will then exist to be reused adding significant value throughout the rest of the app.

In App Notification

Another example of this was the functionality of adding an inactive button compared to an active button. This isn’t 100% necessary for the user to complete his or her task, but an inactive button communicates not being able to continue due to missing or incorrect information. An expectation is very quickly established which will prevent the user from becoming frustrated. Because this only took two days of a developers time to implement and still allowed me to make the first release on time, I decided to keep the functionality.

Buttons

After taking several passing of thin-slicing my designs it was time to prioritize features and then create a roadmap. First, I revised my estimation spreadsheet to reflect the features I removed during my thin-slicing exercise. This provides the basis in creating a ideal roadmap.

A roadmap is chart or graph that can take a number of forms, but ultimately identifies who will be working on what, how long it will take, and when release cycles occur. We have an initial release constraint of four weeks, which equates to a total of 40 man days. With two developers working on the project that will drop the timeline down to 20 man days. Since logging in is mandatory to be able to use the app, the became the main priority. Logging in ended up taking a total of 14 man days for one developer. To cut back time for developing log in, I removed a password reset and sign up feature and decided to instead direct the user to a web view to complete these tasks. Using a web view is not an ideal mobile experience, but it allowed me to get most of the features I really would like for viewing our plan and usage. This dropped the log in estimation by four days.

I prioritized viewing your plan and usage because that is what users were saying they check the most often to help avoid data overages. This ended up being the second most expensive flow to add in the beginning, but like I mentioned earlier to included a large number of reusable components to make further release cycles much quicker. After the thin-sliced flows were mapped, I reintroduced the original features I removed from each flow into the roadmap.

The following is the roadmap I created:

Roadmap v1

One of the primary benefits I received going through this process was the fact that it allowed me to think differently about which features were most important. This was a consideration during design, but without the constraints of time or money you view it differently. It’s a much more pragmatic view when looking at designs. Both are very useful. With a design specific mentality you may tend to focus on creating an ideal experience, which you could. But with a product manager mentality, I felt a mental shift occur which led me to seeing the bare necessities. I think if I introduce this mentality during the design phase, it could arguably reach a more simple and elegant design solution.

Another perspective I took away from this process was also further realizing how expensive each individual control is and how we can make sacrifices to produce similar functionality, even though it maybe not an ideal experience. The realization of how expensive designs are, even a basic understanding, is invaluable when designing a first version of an app. It can help make certain design decisions which will afford v1 to be shipped sooner. Once v1 is released, you can then, go back and add the features that allow the experience to shine. This also gives time for more feedback from real users and ultimately creating a better experience than originally imagined.

The next steps are to actually start producing some of these screens and functionality within Xcode and produce a feature brief outlining the work that has been done to date. I’m excited to dive into Xcode to further gain empathy for what all is involved in a developers world to create the app experience. This will ultimately only make me a better designer.