My AT&T App Redesign: Features, Capabilities, Controls, and Development Meetings

In the last blog post about the My AT&T Redesign I had completed three usability tests, had evaluated the results, and begun to integrate those findings into my application. A link to the post is here. Since then, the project has turned to a more concrete phase, where cost and time have begun to play a role. Within the past two weeks, I’ve redesign my application (both the actions within it, as well as aesthetics), identified the features, controls and capabilities within it, and meet with a Software developer, Chap to get an estimate on the time it will take to develop. Within this article there is an in depth look at each step to explain what these mean.

After I presented my findings for user testing, I received feedback that my application lacked a “realness” to it. So I asked Jon to meet with me and discuss my app at length. In between meeting with Jon and my presentation, I also design three examples of different application styles for my home screens and asked my mentor to give me feedback on them. Below is a PDF of the three styles.

 

HomeScreen_V1-01

My mentor replied with resources for inspiration, a fresh perspective on the three styles, and a nod to the third version as their preferences. After reading her feedback, I decided to use the third option as my style for the next iteration of my application.

While I was still working on creating more visually pleasing screens, I meet with Jon. He suggested I focus on two specific details of the application:

  1. Making the application look more like an IOS application. Pulling toolkits and existing resources to create the screens, rather than my own visuals and buttons in Illustrator.
  2. Concentrate on what is happening within the app. Questioning why I’m including certain flows and actions within my app rather than just accepting “how things have always been done.”

 

An example of how the application lacked a sense of realness can be exemplified in the slider bar I created for the Plan flow. I had created my own slider bar, instead of just pulling from an IOS toolkit. Below is an image of my old slide bar, and now the newer IOS approved one I’ve placed in my application.

 

Sliderbard-01

 

Jon explained that by creating my own icons and buttons I’d made it more difficult for a software developer, because IOS elements have already been coded. Developers just have to copy paste when writing the code when creating those elements. In creating my own, I’m making the developer go and write brand new code, which causes additional unnecessary costs. If I had had a certain element that needed to be completely created from scratch, then I could have asked a developer to specifically make it, but I felt all the elements from the IOS toolkit covered my needs within the application.

An example of Jon’s second point was exemplified in the password flow. Previously I had requested that the user add in their new code and type it twice and I had certain requirements on what the password had to contained. Jon reminded me that I needed to be more conscious of what I’m requiring of users. In my next iteration of the application I striped away all the requriements of changing a password, and only included what I thought would be necessary for a user to feel their password was changed.

After meeting with Jon, I reviewed my printouts and went through each screen marking up what I wanted to keep, to remove, to add, and what needed to be on each screen. This evaluation forced me to review what I was asking of users for each flow, and if I wanted to keep it or trash it. Below is an image of what this process looked like.

 

IMG_0189

 

After reviewing every element of the contents, I began to tackle the organization of the application. Moving flows between the four sections of Billing, Usage, Devices and Account. Once I had a plan that contains all the flows I wanted, and where I wanted them, I was able to start building screen.

In a week, I build every screen for each flow with proper IOS elements and screens that were more consciously crafted. For IOS styling, I downloaded a toolkit to pull elements from, and found resources on the internet that explained the spacing requirements. I referenced the annotated printouts when deciding what elements needed to stay on each screen. I also was able to go back to my inspirations from Q2 and pull in some ideas for that time too.

After creating the new app I needed to get an estimate for the time it would take a developer to create the application. I had learned from class that when developing an application, the real cost is associated with the features and overall time it would take to build the various elements of the application. In order to meet with my developer,  I needed to identify these elements and explain their purpose within the application.

I took all the flows and identified each screen with a number. The on each screen I identified the features and controls with names. A feature is something that adds value to the user’s experience. For example in the application the pie chart containing an account’s data usage. The counterbalance to features are the controls, which are elements that are needed for the structure of the application, such as the accordion information storage style used throughout the application. Once I had each named and identified each feature/control, I printed them out and set up a meeting time with the developer, Chap.

During our meeting, Chap and I discussed each flow individually, identifying the features and controls in context of the flow. As we went through flows Chap and I identified potential error states that needed to be addressed, where there were places of overlap between screens, and some of the more difficult elements of my app and what solutions he saw were possible. As I identified the various elements, Chap was documenting the screen name and element with a point amount associated with the cost of the feature. One point equaled one day of development. Chap then added a 30% padding time for himself so that he had some room if he needed the additional time. So now for each day of estimation, Chap had 1.3 days to complete the feature. Chap then took the total estimated amount of time and divided that between two developers. This is because we assumed the development would be executed by a team of two developers. At the end of our meeting, Chap shared the excel document with me, so I could reference each cost and element. All total my application would take 41.17 day to create if two developers work on it for 8 hours a day. Here is a link with the file: Application Estimates 

The two most expensive features in the application came from the password feature options, first the option to replace your password with the Iphone’s Touch ID and the second was to opt out of having a password. For both of these features they were estimated to take around 3 and a half days for two developers. For perspective, on average my other features were only estimated to take about 87% of two developers days. This is high estimate was due two pieces. First Chap explained that he’d need to understand if it was even possible to have these options within the application, and secondly there needed to be the estimated time associated with building out these elements. His explanation of these two steps helped me understand where these costs were coming from and what that time would be spent doing.

Another interesting element Chap highlighted during our meeting, was that when coding all of these pieces, he would need to work with various teams within AT&T to write out the proper code to extract that information associated with the accounts. An element from my application that required direct communication with AT&T to gain the right information is the Data Usage pie chart. Since the information displayed is so specific to the account, Chap would need to code the right request to display the various percentages of usage. That information would need to come directly from AT&T. This also means there is a general costs with working on any app that is spent by the developer familiarize themselves with other resources they would potentially we working with.

Since my meeting with Chap, I’ve updated the screens to reflect the changes we discussed, and I updated my flows so that they contain both the screen title, and the cost associated with their buildout. Below are links to each sections’ flows with costs associated with them.

Home & Billing Flows

Devices Flow

Plan Flows

Account Flows

Since this project is under a time constraint of four week, I now need to reduce my development time. This means, going through my application and deciding which features and controls are going to be keep and which are going to be eliminated for the first launch, but added back in later. I’m looking forward to working out a way to deliver a valuable application to the client, but still maintain our timeline of four week of development work.