My AT&T Redesign: Roadmap

Since last week’s update, the AT&T application redesign has continued to work towards the goal of release. Previously I had presented our newly updated hero flows for all screens within the application and asked a software developer for an estimate on the time it would take to create each feature. Once I meet with the software developer I understood that the application would take around 42 days to complete. This date is contingent on having two designers working on the application for 40 hours a week. Now though, there is an additional constraint, I must release a version of the application within the next four weeks, or 20 working days, that still delivers on the value promise previously established. Within this post I explain the review process the application went through to produce a version that contained limited features, but still delivered on the value. I also explain the process of roadmapping, a technique used to schedule the development of the different features of the application for its phased releases.

Before any of the review process occurred, I reminded myself of the value promise I had originally established. The value promise is what I wanted to deliver to the user. This value promise is derived from direct quotes and insights made through research. For AT&T I had two pieces that grounded my value promise. One individual said the current application “could almost just be a widget, all it needs to do is allow me to pay my monthly bill and view my data usage”. This sentiment helped me understand that users don’t find value in the frivolous additional actions the current application offers. It also alluded to the fact that users want to have control over their service. The most important aspects of a user’s service would seem to be a user’s ability to pay their own bill and their ability to review their data. In being able to view their own data, a user feels more in control to prevent any overages. Additionally, many of the users I spoke with agreed that the current application “does way too much”. From this and other similar sentiments, it can be concluded that users don’t want a swiss army knife application, but one that is deliberate in its capabilities. After synthesizing users quotes, I concluded that the AT&T application redesign should deliver an application that is less capable, but more intentional in its operations and there needed to be a sense of control given to the user on sensitive matters.

Delivering on the value promise was again only one constraint, I also had to work out a way to release my application with features within 20 working days. This meant I needed to review what were the essential features of my application that could be created in the 20 working days and released. These were the two established constraints I was working within.

I began reviewing all the features and flows alongside their estimate. In order to prevent myself from duplicating times, I cut out each screen and physically mapped out how the application would work. Then I began to quantify the total costs of each screen, and added some preliminary notes around what the application needed to do in the first release. I organized my work based on four sections of the application: Login, Billing, Usage, Devices and Account. Below are two images of these physical maps with my additional comments and notes on the various screens.  Billing
Account

Again, mapping out these different sections helped make sure I didn’t duplicate estimated times for feature development. It also helped me separate the different flow between what would be published in each different phase. Finally, the method helped me see where various features overlapped. Knowing when features needed to be put in the same release helped me make sure they were placed in a release order that made sense.

Once I had figured out the costs of each feature and its place within my application, I began to review what features I wanted within the first release of the application. I’ll refer to this release as Phase I. Again the constraint tied to this release was that it could only include 20 working days. The other constraint I was working with was the value promise. I took these constraints and reviewed my application to see what essential actions of the application were needed to deliver the value promise and and what could be developed in the allotted time period.

I knew from the beginning the Phase I release needed to have the Login and Home features. These were essential since they’re necessary for opening the application. Based on the assumption that the application needed to give users control over their monthly bill and their data, I decided that those two flows needed to be added to the application’s Phase I release as well. Now the tricky part was that with the flows that had been included in Phase I: Login, Home screen, Pay bill, View data; there were already a number of additional flows that were necessary to build out the essential flows. These additional flows included: Managing payment methods, Change password for a Word, Change user name. Each of these flows were needed in Phase I in order for the essential flows to be functional.

Then I adding up all these costs associated with the full flows and found I was over the 20 day limit. Below is an image of my math, showing the cost of each feature for the flow and how they were over my 20 day limit.

 

Phase I Costs

In order to cut down the costs even further I made the decision to remove the option of having no password as a feature. Originally, my three password options were the most expensive part of my application, so I knew from the beginning since security wasn’t part of my value promise I would need to remove a password option feature or two from the Phase I release. After I removed the flow for no password and the login options for no password, I had reach the goal of about 19 days for development.

From there I began the whole process over again with only the remaining features. The challenge with these features and flows, was the question of what would deliver the most value in the next phase. Since there was no time constraint, I had to discern their delivered value as the only constraint.

The foundation of my application is structured around delivering a small number of actions done well, and on giving the user control. The Phase II focus was then structured around data and users control. The activities I had design to be accessed from data were “Change Data” and “Send Notification”. By allowing a customer to change their data on their own, they again feel a newfound sense of control. By giving a user the ability to see their data is almost over and sent out a messages, the user can again feel more in control of their data and service. Each of these actions give the user a better sense of control over their data.

For the final Phase, again there was a reduction on constraints. I no longer needed to worry about the time constraint, and I didn’t need to worry about the value promise, since all my features collectively delivered up on it. Rather with this phase, I focused on how I wanted the software developers working on the features so that there would be a minimal amount of blockage between the two developers. This issue wasn’t ignored on the other flows, it just became a much larger issue with the final Phase III assets. If it came to be I know I would be able to remove a few of these remaining features

After I had learned which features would be placed in which Phase, I began to “Road Map” the features out. This in a broad sense means mapping out when each feature is created by the software designer. On a more granular degree, I created an Excel sheet that contained each of the resources, on the y-axis and the days of the week on the x-axis and I plotted where and when a feature was created. It also contains direction around how many resources would be applied to the feature for creation. For the first round, I was drawing these maps out next to the Phase’s features and estimated time. Below is a picture of my each phases’ sheet:

 

RoadMap

 

One of the largest constraint I struggled with while mapping out the features was making sure I wasn’t causes development block. If a feature was dependent on another feature, I had to make sure to organize the timeline so that the first feature was build before the other. After I had a paper version of the graph locked, I then started to digitize them. In digitizing the timelines, I also added a short explanation for each feature being developed, as well as a color that coordinated with the section of the application. Below are links to two PDFs containing the roadmaps.

Roadmap- Phase 1

Roadmap- Phase II&III
As we continue working on the My AT&T redesign, our next steps including writing out the HTML code for a screen of the application to actually work, and creating a document for another individual that explains what the new application looks like, why it’s an improvement from the last version and how to build it out.