Concept Mapping: Understanding Mobile Banking

The second quarter has started, and in our Rapid Ideation and Creative Problem Solving class we are learning how to redesign a mobile banking application.
The first step in our process has been to create a high level Concept Map of the basic activities that entail managing ones money through a mobile app.
I decided to choose my Bank of America mobile application since it is the one that I use the most. I have always had mixed feelings with this application and its web counterpart. The mobile app seems easier to use in some aspects but harder for others, and viceversa.
Before we dived into concept mapping, as a group, we started by brainstorming a bunch of words that we associated with banking. With these words, we created a 2×2 matrix in order to identify relationships between the main features / actions related to banking. The rows & columns with the greater number of interactions/relationships between each other are the ones that I identified as the essential features of the mobile banking activity:
2×2 Banking Matrix
 
Highlight 2x2 matrix

Once I identified these essential features, I translated them into a more digestible visualization – this is how the following “Relationships” Concept Map was created:

Relationships Concept Map (Low Fidelity)

Relationships - concept map

After this first attempt, I switched to Sketch and re-created a high fidelity version of the map:

Relationships Concept Map

%22Relationships%22 Concept Map(no title)

After our relationships map, we started by “dissecting” the existing application. We did this by taking a screenshot of every single screen on the app. We were to explore features that we had never imagined existed. We ended up with hundreds of screens. This helped us create an understanding of how the flow of the application worked, and it looked something like this:

Existing Screen Inventory 

Screen Shot 2017-10-30 at 11.27.34 AM

We then created a Navigation Information Architecture Concept Map based on the existing application. It got very saturated and complex after a while.

Existing Navigation Information Architecture Map

Existing-BoA

Legend

  • Circle size: I decided to communicate features with higher number of options by enclosing them in a big circle, the more options the feature had, the bigger the circle.
  • Line weight: I also decided to communicate higher frequency of feature use by using a thicker line weight.
  • Dashed circle: Are the customizable features that you can add from “settings”.

After recreating the existing Bank of America mobile application concept map, my understanding of the use of the app was bigger and brighter. I discovered new features I still don’t know if I’m ever going to use, but it also helped me think about possible use case scenarios of how I would go about using the app for a particular situation I were to encounter.

I used this new knowledge to create a redesigned version of the BoA mobile application:

Redesigned - BoA Concept Map

For my redesigned version, I highlighted blue and relocated the areas that I’ve noticed are important and might not currently be in the right place. BoA’s application puts their “Help” button front and center – which stays on the header – so that users can access and type in their questions for self-help. But a more clear placement and wording could guide users accomplish their most common banking tasks in an efficient way.

Bank of America’s mobile application has many features and products that can make it somewhat difficult to navigate, although I attribute the navigation difficulty to a few interactive elements. The app allows for customization which aims to fit different user needs. But this customization capability isn’t immediately obvious and can go unnoticed by many users. I asume this could be especially the case for those users that don’t take the time to explore the capabilities and who just prefer to schedule an appointment at a branch for their needs.

For the rest of this second quarter we will continue working on re-designing our banks mobile application. I’m excited to show the rest of the process!