Jaime by Design: The boy who failed design

For this quarter’s last assignment, the class was tasked to analyze and synthesize articles on how designers think.

Design practitioners such as Chris Pacione, Nigel Cross and Edward de Bono, analyze what is known about the particular skillset of a designer. These have to do with the ability to recognize ill-defined problems and how they go about understanding and testing an idea quickly without much structure to start from.

Jocelyn Wyatt, introduces the concept of “mindshift”, which targets mostly organizations that have always done the same things the same way, or different things the same way, and how design is a practice that could help a organizations, be it big or small, to start designing the right things for the right people.

For this assignment, I found the concept of “design as a new way of literacy” which many of these authors suggest throughout the readings, particularly interesting. The idea of design being taught as a part of a traditional school curriculum in order to instill design abilities to all humans alike resonated with me personally. Envisioning a world of humans that only had to interact with systems and things that were designed solely with them in mind is beyond of what I or maybe anyone can even imagine. This is why I created the following video that narrates the story of a boy who was bad at Design in school and the reason he why he decided to overcome this: Jaime by Design

I found this assignment to be particularly entertaining since I studied Industrial Design. So I guess that makes me one of those people that “think in a particular way”? and that has skills that other people would like to have and potentially should have for the long run? One thing that I do have to say is that, even though I am more comfortable than many working with uncertainty, and find the process of putting things to paper before saying them out loud the most helpful practice ever, design methodologies are something that you will never stop learning from. Because, just opposite to how math has ways to find a definitive answer to a problem, design needs a myriad of tools to help designers or creatives, or inventors, to help them try to solve the unpredictability of systems created by humans for humans, otherwise known as Wicked Problems.