Wireframing a better mobile bank experience. Sorry, Chase!

 

After spending hours creating a Concept Map of new, better Chase Bank App I was ready to make next step and wireframe the App.

Wireframes are a wonderful visual tools to communicate the intended designed user flows in a mobile application or website. They do not have a goal to show how the final version of the app is going to look like, but they lay the foundation of the potential designed system.

Doing wireframes I was targeting next problems I discovered on a stage on Concept Mapping.

1. As almost every other Bank App Chase makes its client learn bank language. To successfully use it the client needs to know the difference between functions like “Transfer money”, “Pay Bills”, “Wire Transfer”, “QuickPay”, “Zelle”. Even if it looks so obvious for some people, for others it looks like nightmare to the point that they reject trying to use it at all.

To keep myself aware of this problem, I created a scenario where main persona has just these struggles.

Her name is Brenda. She is from Texas. Brenda is a retired piano teacher. She loves to walk with her dog and drink mimosa on Sunday morning. Twice a year she visits her sister and her 3 nieces in Oklahoma. She mostly use cash and checks, and she is looking for a way to send some money for her nieces’ Birthdays and other milestones sometimes. Now Brenda deals with the Chase App trying to do that, but since it is not her routine, she needs to learn it again every time she needs it. She doesn’t know anything about how banks work and doesn’t really want to know. She just want to transfer some money to her sister once in awhile.

I tried to redesign the app to make it more needs-driven than services-driven. Now web app will make this job on defining a type of need for itself. Customer just need to know what he wants to accomplish.

2. If some problems are caused by the industry, some of them are definitely caused by poor design decisions. As I already mentioned in my previous article – Chase App seems to be purposefully complicated and swollen. 30% of links in main menu bring you outside of the App (half of them are really “ads” but you don’t know it until you try). To be able to do some core functions like Wire Transfer and Pay Bills you need to enroll on the website (but you don’t know that you can do it until you learn it on the website – it just won’t display in the mobile app until you do that). And to add a new Payee for a wire transfer you need to add them on website as well and can not do it in the mobile app. It may be very frustrating for some people. For example, for Ness.

This is Ness. He is an electrician and lives in New Jersey. Ness just got divorced and now he needs to fully take care of himself. He recently moved in in his new apartment. He already bought an iron and burnt 2 shirts. He knows that his wife always paid for utilities using her phone, so he decided to try as well. He downloaded Chase App, but he can not find a way to pay them. He is very frustrated. He doesn’t want to call his ex-wife and show that he is so helpless without her.

I included Pay Bills and Wire Transfer as default functions on the App. I also made a brave decision to exclude all promotions from main screen to simplify the app, but I have some ideas how to promote the bank services in less annoying way (follow the blog for next iterations).

3. Even though Chase App is very functional it still doesn’t have a proper level of consistency between all the functions (that are similar, but for some reason act so differently). And it’s overwhelming. Working on it I couldn’t stop thinking about it. How is it possible that huge company with the best professionals have products which is like an undercooked soup – somebody just through vegetables in a pot with cold water. And even if it looks like a soup, it doesn’t taste good. Meet Matt. He knows what I’m talking about.

This is Matt. He is a very successful project manager in a large company. He eats healthy food, runs every morning and networks every night. He is very busy. He likes to complete all routine daily tasks on a run. He uses his phone to pay his bills, pay to his lawn-mower, manage his multiple accounts, and sometimes even making international wire transfers. He uses Chase Checking, Savings accounts and Credit Cards, and likes to keep track of all of his transactions. He mostly uses his phone up to make sure there is not a single transactions he is not aware of.

My goal was to create more consistent, coherence application: one of the major overhauls I did is making all kinds of Transfer options have the flow be as similar to each other as possible, so that the experience isn’t that drastically different from one to another.

_Everything

This week I’ll test the first iteration of redesigned Chase App with real people. But before I’ll dive into usability testing, I’ll make sure all screens are present and make sense. I’m very excited to revise the screens and flow based on critique and testing. Stay tuned!