Design & Poverty: The Harry Potter Lens

Sometimes when I want to understand something deeper I apply a Harry Potter lens to it. I’m a Meyers-Briggs ISTP, which Harry Potter character is that? Oh, it’s Harry. That makes sense: I’m in my own head a lot, I’m not trying to be the center of attention but when it comes down to it, I’ll get things done. And I’m an Enneagram 5, which Harry Potter character is that? Snape? Oh, well, that didn’t help as much.

So I did the same thing for this assignment. I created a comic strip called “Harry Potter and the Plight of the House Elves.” In adding my perspective, I chose to do it through Harry. The author’s perspectives I chose to have Harry represent were Hobbes, Pilliton and Yunus.

For the entire comic strip, click here.

Harry Potter spitting Hobbes realness.
Harry Potter spitting Hobbes realness.

I definitely agree with the idea that what is a good solution for one group won’t apply to everyone across the board. As a designer it’s a reminder for me to dream small and perhaps more importantly, stay flexible! In solving wicked problems I may never be able to dust my hands and feel like I’m done.

Harry Potter and the Words of Pilliton.
Harry Potter and the Words of Pilliton.

In theory I agree with Pilliton that you have to really immerse yourself into a culture in order to solve the problems worth solving and ensuring that they are problems worth solving to that community. But it’s terrifying and I don’t feel ready to commit to that level of work yet. I’m sure that if something arose that I was passionate about, I’d move in a heartbeat. But selfishly, right now, I’d rather find a problem worth solving somewhere cool, like Stockholm or Berlin.

Harry Potter and the Grameen Bank.
Harry Potter and the Grameen Bank.

Harry’s final solution looks a lot like Mohammad Yunus’ plan for the Grameen Bank- incremental freedoms (amounts of money in the case of the Grameen Bank) to help them lift themselves out of poverty. When I first heard about the Grameen Bank 10ish years ago I thought it was revolutionary. I haven’t looked into it recently, maybe as Hobbles suggests, the model has cracks showing now that it’s expanded and maybe it doesn’t work everywhere. (That would be my suspicion.)

In the end, Harry finds himself wondering if there were a magical school where he could learn to solve these wicked problems. In that regard, Harry and I are in the same place: school. But he’s learning magic and I’m learning methods. Hopefully one day, though, when I’m practicing what I’m learning here it can look like magic.