Making MB into YB (your bank)

This week we headed into the field to test our wireframes with users. To recruit participants I asked ppl I encountered if they were available for 40 minutes. The first interview with a neighbor and only took 20 min. Thereafter I asked for 30 min and interviewed 2 Uber drivers, a receptionist at the doctor, and a peer. Four of the participants went through 3 flows on my cellphone: check balance, deposit a check, pay a friend.

1
Checking account balance
Of the three tasks, this is the only one that I was able to complete within my existing banking app…. and this had the most intriguing results! I set up my test with 2 paths to check the balance: one was the traditional path of logging in: typing username, then password to arrive at a welcome screen with the account balance. Additional screens shows transactions and then details of a single transaction.

The second route to see the balance is right on the login screen as text labeled “instant balance”. This is my favorite part of the MB banking app! I appreciate the clean layout of the app so kept the login screen the same. BUT… not one of the users noticed this first off. One hesitated and read the entire screen but then continued the login.

Design considerations: I will look to find a balance to make the instant balance feature more prominent.

2
Depositing a check
It’s important for ppl to know they photographed their checks right. People fear getting to the end and only then being told they were not successful.

Design considerations: Change the image capture for checks to make it clearer that the image is acceptable. It would be very nice to use green color!

3
Paying a friend
The deposit check feature didn’t work for me in the MB app so I wasn’t able to progress through the flow in the existing app. MB does not offer bill pay, external transfer, or send money to a friend in the existing app. That meant this feature required me to build another screen into the “move money” tab and I became worried about the feature becoming long and clunky.

Users were confused by the pay today vs schedule in the future vs repeating payments.

Design considerations: Feedback was all over the place here so I didn’t hear the same recommendations from anyone. I suspect this is because I referenced a bunch of sources for examples and so my design lacked some element of consistency. My next steps will be to make quick iterations and get feedback in the studio.

My takeaways from overall user testing:
Some of my flows ended by returning to the section main screen and some ended with a confirmation. I want to give a more thorough analysis of when a user benefits to going back to the section home versus the welcome screen.

Users each liked different phrasing for the actions I had identified. People are accustomed to how things are designated in their own app.

I had some physical constraints this week so had to be creative in the way I recruited participants (hello Uber drivers and doctor receptionists!) Next round will be a different approach! I feel my data would have been richer being able to preschedule.

This was our first time conducting user testing interviews. Over the previous 2 quarters making data useful for design inspiration has come through distilling patterns in behavior. Generally, users were serious, some users talked about worries they had during flows based on previous bad experiences and fear of something going wrong. I couldn’t help but consider how user behavior would change if we were testing a recipe app or a game. In further iterations I would like to consider how in app banking can be a more ‘enriching experience’.