Testing the Frame

This week, we began our first foray into user testing our redesigned applications. I conducted 6 interviews with men and women aged 25-33. I had each go through the exercise of completing three actions with my redesigned Wells Fargo application:

  • Depositing a check
  • Setting alerts
  • Paying a friend

I began the entire redesign exercise with the intention of simplifying the existing application. It was apparently upon immediate analysis that the existing app had many ways to navigate to the same thing, making it unclear what was the quickest way to accomplish what you needed. I hoped to reduce that in my redesign.

However, I noticed from my very first user interview that, while there were a number of changes that I made which helped, there were small and big changes I had made that caused confusion and increased the time it took to complete an action.

In all, I had 8 key findings from my interviews:

  1. Top, center-justified logo gives the impression that it is clickable and should take users “Home”

    Multiple users tried to click the logo to go home and got frustrated that they had to click the back button to get where they wanted to go.
    Multiple users tried to click the logo to go home and got frustrated that they had to click the back button to get where they wanted to go.
  2. “Sign out” button on the bottom of each page sends message that Wells Fargo “wants user to leave the app”

    Currently, there is a center-justified button at the bottom of each page of the Wells Fargo app. I had a personal opinion at the start of my redesign but 3 of the 6 interviews remarked on this throughout as a negative experience.
    Currently, there is a center-justified button at the bottom of each page of the Wells Fargo app. I had a personal opinion at the start of my redesign but 3 of the 6 interviews remarked on this throughout as a negative experience.
  3. Deposit confirmation screen does not give enough confirmation

    Two of my participants felt underwhelmed by and untrusting after viewing the deposited check confirmation screen.
    Two of my participants felt underwhelmed by and untrusting after viewing the deposited check confirmation screen.
  4. While distinction of information included in both is clear the titles “Profile” and “Menu” are confusing
  5. Users understood that the "Profile" tab contained personal information where the "Menu" contained account information. In my next iteration I will be testing other names for the "Profile" section.
    Users understood that the “Profile” tab contained personal information where the “Menu” contained account information. In my next iteration I will be testing other names for the “Profile” section.
  6. + 7. Not understanding the mail or push notification icons

    None of my users immediately understood the "Mail" symbol (which was meant to look like a stamp, though multiple people remarked that it looked like a frame) or the "Push Notification" symbol. In my next iteration I plan to test the symbols on the right to get a sense of if those are clearer.
    None of my users immediately understood the “Mail” symbol (which was meant to look like a stamp, though multiple people remarked that it looked like a frame) or the “Push Notification” symbol. In my next iteration I plan to test the symbols on the right to get a sense of if those are clearer.

8. No sense of how to navigate to the action of Paying a Friend

In the wireframes I tested with, users navigated from the menu to a screen where they were asked to select the account they wanted to transfer from and then select the account they wanted to transfer into, one of the options being to "Pay a Friend." Few got even to that point and so in my next iteration I want to ring things in sooner.
In the wireframes I tested with, users navigated from the menu to a screen where they were asked to select the account they wanted to transfer from and then select the account they wanted to transfer into, one of the options being to “Pay a Friend.” Few got even to that point and so in my next iteration I want to ring things in sooner.

There were also a number of ancillary learnings about the login page and some of the other functionality within the app that I look forward to also exploring in my next iteration.

There were a lot of learnings this week but the biggest was around how to conduct proper user testing. My first interview I sat directly next to my participant and I found that this made the interview more intense and conversational than I wanted. The next interview I stood behind the participant while they navigated the app. This was an awkward dynamic in some ways (as I hovered to see what they were pressing and what they were looking at) but ultimately led to much better insight.