anna.krachey@ac4d.com

Alumni

Anna Krachey

Anna Krachey is an artist and university lecturer. Originally from Boston, she came to Austin eight years ago for graduate school at UT and has no plans to leave. As an artist, her photographs investigate, through off kilter humor, the ways that the familiar can be flipped into the strange and unexpected. She believes that connecting with others is the most important thing in life. Teaching fulfills an important part of this equation for her because it allows to affect other people through an empathetic process.

Anna is a total coffee snob and loves horses, subarus and her extremely charming dog, Bea. She is ready to learn everything ever at AC4D.

Recent blog posts

Coda: Inner Circle Part 1

I’ve always been interested in childbirth- fascinated, because it’s amazing. And then petrified, because everything I’ve ever seen or heard about it is so scary; why is that? It’s a process our bodies are designed for. When my team was looking for topics to research, we came across an article in the NYT detailing some…

Understanding Our Inner Circle Application Through Context and HCI Design Theory

Our design team is knee deep in piloting our design idea around pregnancy, labor and delivery called Inner Circle: The Birth Plan for Everyone Else.  You can read more about it here.  In Chris Risdon’s Theory class we started off the quarter reading about Human Centered Interaction (HCI) and context in which technology is used.…

The Impact of Storytelling: An update on our design process around pregnancy, labor and delivery

James Lewis, Meghan Corbett and I are pushing ahead with our design idea around pregnancy, labor and delivery.  You can read our last update on the blog here.  Our design idea which is becoming a “thing,” is called Inner Circle: The Birth Plan for Everyone Else.  Our research last quarter pointed so strongly to our…

Addressing Birth as a Process Instead of a Procedure: Our Q2 Research at AC4D

James Lewis, Meghan Corbett and Anna Krachey have been doing design research around pregnancy and child birth decisions over the last eight weeks at AC4D. We became interested in doing research around pregnancy when we read about some surprising statistics in The New York Times. The United States has the highest cost in the world…

Honeywell Thermostat Redesign FINAL Crack At It!

As a user, I am willing to try to learn the navigation of an interface to a certain degree the first time that I use it.  Then, I expect the learning curve to significantly drop as I have learned the primary behaviors that make the system work and am able to apply them to secondary…

Honeywell Thermostat Redesign: Crack at Iteration #4

One of the primary things that I’ve been learning from iterating on my thermostat design using wireframes is that the user testing that we’ve been using, called Think Aloud Testing (read my previous post for more info here) really only allows me to observe the ways in which my design functions or doesn’t function.  It…

Research on Pregnancy and Child Birth Choices: Thinking of Labor as an Endurance Event?

James Lewis and I have been doing research on how socioeconomics affect pregnancy and birth choices.  Meghan Corbett has just recently joined our research team and efforts.   So far we’ve talked to pregnant women, midwives, doulas, public health workers, moms, and those working with young fathers and women who were pregnant teens and mothers.…

Honeywell Thermostat Redesign Crack at it #2 and User Testing Thoughts

I’ve just completed the user testing for iteration 2 of my Honeywell Thermostat redesign that we’re working on in Matt Franks’ Rapid Iteration class.   In my last post (to be read here) I discuss the objective of my redesign: making the interface of the thermostat as intuitively navigatable as possible as well as the method…

Honeywell Thermostat Redesign Crack at it #1

In IDSE 201, we’re redesigning a Honeywell Thermostat unit.  The original unit, as I described in my first post, is a “disaster.”  What I mean by this is that the interface is so complex and unintuitive that it is nearly impossible to navigate.  The user can’t learn the map of the system and then use…

Honeywell Thermostat Concept Model and Redesign Concept Model #1

In Rapid Ideation and Problem Solving, we’ve begun our semester long project.  We will be focusing on the redesign and iteration (8x!!) of the Honeywell Thermostat.  Woah.  The interface is a disaster.  I have no idea how homeowners make any sense of navigating this thing.  Well, my guess is they don’t, hence the redesign. For…

Final Video Reflection on $1000 Project

Reflection that went into the the thought process behind choosing partnership and business model for the $1000 project.

Position Diagram on The Importance of Human Nuance in Problem Solving by Anna Krachey

In Design Theory class, we recently read 4 researcher’s writing on issues of problem solving. Below are the axis labels to describe how I organized their positions on a 2×2 diagram in order to chart how each author views the importance of human nuance in problem solving.  I explain each author’s stance in greater detail…

Anna Krachey's Video Reflection #1 on the Thousand Dollar Project

James Lewis and I have started the headshot company Pictureday ATX.  Watch this to hear my thoughts two weeks into the project….

Using Position Diagramming to Understand Personal Growth Through Exposure to Information

In Design Theory class, we used position diagramming to synthesize 8 authors’ positions on technology.   Instead of taking a stance and then plotting the authors’ in relate to where they stand on my stance, I took a different approach.  I identified strongly with points from several of the authors writing on the influx of…

Using Design Researchers' Methodologies to Determine their Stance on Pain in Childbirth

Our assignment in Design, Society and the Public Sector was to create a position diagram of Design For/With on an axis with labels of our choice.  I was finding the reading very abstract, and in trying to understand how they might relate to each other, I came up with a visceral metric with which to…

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