kylie.jack@ac4d.com

Alumni

Kylie Jack

Kylie Jack co-founded Austin technology and startup consultancy Source Spring, where she led the software development practice. Since its inception in 2009, Kylie has helped startups like Bedrock and Manage My ASC design and build their software systems, while also providing technology consulting for businesses like the Texas Performing Arts Center and Rallyhood. In 2003, she co-founded entertainment software company Front Gate Tickets and created its e-commerce and reserved seating systems. Prior to Front Gate, Kylie was a software architect for Sapient and Human Code where she helped clients like the IC2 Institute, Nickelodeon and Leap Frog. Kylie holds a bachelor’s degree in fine arts from Alfred University and a master’s of science in project management from St. Edward’s University.

I’ve worked with so many people who have great ideas, but who aren’t sure how to make them happen. That’s where I come in. I help people turn these ideas into something tangible. I work with them from design through deployment, asking questions, prodding at corner-cases, setting priorities, and finding solutions to tough design and technical problems.

 

Recent blog posts

Abductive inference and sense-making

In our latest batch of readings for our theory class, I was particular interested in deconstructing a lecture from Charles Pierce. He is considered “the father of pragmatism.” Given that he is a philosopher and logician, his lecture, “The Three Cotary Positions,” is particularly thick, and I found difficult to parse: which made it a…

Designing for Emotion

In IDSE302: Theory of Interaction Design and Entrepreneurship, professor Chris Risdon asked for a position diagram on the role and importance of technology in the world based on the last few weeks of readings. I used that theme as a jumping off point. In fact, technology, especially computing, is practically inescapable now. In the past,…

Course Scheduler: A Fond Farewell

This is the last iteration of our course scheduler wireframes for IDSE201, in which we bid a fond farewell—or good riddance—depending on how the process went. I must admit that this iteration and the last one were a complete struggle. The last iteration didn’t change much, but this time I found a little bit more…

Course Scheduling: Incremental Iterations

The gap between the second and third iterations of my course scheduling system was pretty big. That was necessary to fill in major pieces of missing functionality and fix some very broken interface elements. But the last iteration worked very well in testing, so this round has more minor revisions to it. Things to look…

Course Scheduling: Reducing Steps

After the last iteration of the course scheduler wireframes, I was given the feedback to be boring: focus on “simple, clean, and easy to use.” This is the latest result, both in an interactive Flash prototype, and in PDF format. At the beginning of this iteration, I went in search of college degree plans mainly…

Course Scheduling: A Simpler Approach

After the first iteration of our wireframes for a hypothetical course scheduler, I felt the results were fairly complete. Unfortunately, the “information density” was extremely high. (See the previous iteration here.) Fair criticism. So on for this second iteration, rather than finish out the functionality, I decided to start with a new concept. I tried…

Wicked Systems

As designers ready to work on wicked problems, we face a dilemma. Wicked problems are inherently unsolvable; we must break them down into pieces, into more well-structured problems. At the same time though, we must seek to understand how our products, services, and businesses fit into a bigger system and scheme. This big picture view…

Improving Course Selection and Degree Planning

(Click to download full version in PDF format) In our Rapid Ideation and Prototyping class, our assignment this week, and for the next eight weeks, is to design an online application for planning and tracking school classes. In the initial pass, we develop personas (“fictional characters created to represent the different user types within a…

Subtle Progress

For our IDSE201 Rapid Ideation class, we’ve been tasked with really noticing digital user interface elements in fine-grained detail and discuss why it works—or doesn’t. To the left is an icon in iTunes (if it’s not animated, click the image to open it in a new window). If you subscribe to iTunes Match, each time…

Position Diagram 4: Experience, Bias, and Designing for Difficult Problems

This is the final diagram for Jon Kolko’s class, “Design, Society, and the Public Sector.” Like the last diagram, this artifact had to stand on its own with little explanation or exposition. Additional parameters were placed on it as well: “pithy, succinct, small.” Given that most of my previous diagrams relied on narratives spanning 6…

Position Diagram 3: Harmonious Design

In our theory class, this week’s diagrams had to be presented in class with no talking or setup. The artifacts had to stand on their own. Therefore, I’ll present mine the same way here:

The overload strategy and killing ideas

One of the strategies behind the curriculum at AC4D is to assign more work than is probably accomplishable at any given time. As a class, we’ve discussed what we learn from this. Several theories were floated, and most were confirmed by faculty. 1) Overload makes sure that there are no gaps in creating, delivering, and…

Radical Innovation

In the last three Design, Society and the Public Sector classes, we covered several perspectives on ethnographic techniques, the difference between designing for and designing with, as well as frameworks for conducting research and discussing research methods. One reading was a controversial article from Don Norman (whose Design of Everyday Things was my first introduction…

Talking to Strangers

This pleasant chap pictured here has it easy when he cold calls—who’d turn down coffee or a quick lunch with him? For me though, it’s a little more nerve racking. The question that resonates for me is, “What do I have to offer that people would want to meet with me sight unseen?” Cold-calling isn’t…

Expand Your Digital Presence

When we talk about our digital presence, Twitter, Facebook, blogs and personal web pages are natural starting points. All these options excel in how general purpose they are. The sky is the limit for how you want to balance your personal or professional personas. But I’d like to bring up a few other options that…

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