laura.galos@ac4d.com

Alumni

Laura Galos

Laura Galos is a copywriter developing the design and entrepreneurial skills needed to bring ideas beyond words and into action. Originally from Pittsburgh, she spent five years in New York City working with advertising agencies in the Havas and Omnicom networks. In 2012, Laura traded in bagels for breakfast tacos, moving to sunny Austin with her husband, Jonathan.

Laura comes to AC4D to fulfill her intention of developing a career that derives its meaning from helping others. She believes that design thinking can be applied as a fulcrum to budge some of the most intractable problems of the world. In terms of personal development, she expects this year will be one of unprecedented growth, learning, creating, thinking, collaborating, and doing.

Laura’s other interests include working with museums, creating a line of greeting cards (sold locally under the name Hazel Blake), and hunting down coffee like a caffeine-seeking missile.

 

Recent blog posts

True Story: The get to know you game for people you’ve known your whole life.

Thanks to everyone who has been following and helping with our AC4D project, True Story. We are so excited to share with you what we’ve created and what’s next for our product. Our Project: A Recap Over the past 9 months, Maryanne Lee and I have been researching, designing for, and testing solutions that can…

Micro-disruption

For our final readings of our year at AC4D, we discussed four texts under the theme of the “Obligations of Entrepreneurship.” As we continue to work on our respective student projects and build business models around them in other classes, the consideration of obligations becomes especially relevant. What are we promising when we put things…

Products in the Wild

At AC4D, our class has started the quarter with readings by Michael Hobbes, writer for the New Republic, Aneel Karnani, Professor at the Ross School of Business at University of Michigan, and our teacher, Jon Kolko. We discussed the readings as a class with a focus on “intentions.” The texts point to a variety of…

Small talk about big decisions

Here at AC4D, we are in our 6th week of ideating and creating a design solution to address social issues each of our groups found in research. As of last week, our team, (Maryanne Lee, Laura Galos) decided to move forward with a concept called (working title) “Meaningful Mail.” This is a service that lets…

Last Stop: Final Iteration of the CapMetro App

We’ve made it to the last week of Q2 at AC4D, and to our last iteration of our project; redesigning the CapMetro app. The CapMetro app is used by riders of the CapMetro public transportation system here in Austin, and allows users to purchase and use tickets, find routes, see schedules, and more. Over the…

CapMetro App Redesign: Iteration 6

This week, our Rapid Ideation and Creative Problem Solving class at AC4D completed the sixth iteration of our redesign of the CapMetro app. CapMetro, Austin’s public transportation service, provides this app for commuters using their bus and rail lines. I mostly worked on the “Account” section of the app this week, but as a broad overview,…

Maps in the CapMetro App

In week 6 of our Rapid Ideation and Creative Problem Solving class, I’ve been thinking about maps. Maps are weird. They’re useful, but they’re also overwhelming. There’s a lot of information included in a map that isn’t helpful to me at a given moment (such as the names of streets I’m not using, for example).…

Focusing on real customers

In our Service Design class at AC4D, we’ve been reading a paper co-authored by Mary Jo Bitner, Edward M. Carson Chair of Service Marketing at Arizona State University. In “ Service Blueprinting: A Practical Technique for Service Innovation,” Bitner introduces the idea of service blueprinting as a tool to help the design of services, one…

Reiterating Simplicity: CapMetro App Redesign, Week 4

When our class began the assignment to redesign the CapMetro app (app for the public transportation system in Austin), I think we all wanted to make the app simpler to use. But simplicity means different things to each of us, whether it’s making an app that does just one thing very well or adding different functions…

Invisible servicescapes, tangible effects

Mary Jo Bitner, Edward M. Carson Chair in Service Marketing at Arizona State University, published a paper in 1992 called, “Servicescapes: The Impact of Physical Surroundings on Customers and Employees. We’re reading this text in our Service Design class to get a perspective on the physical aspects of service design. By “servicescapes,” Bitner is referring…

Testing CapMetro App in the Wild

This week our class began testing our proposed ideas for the re-designed CapMetro app. In order to get a sense of how people would navigate the app, I printed wireframes (revised based on our last in-class critique) on paper, and cut them out so they’d be one per page. I then conducted “think-aloud” testing with…

Service with a Smile: The Role of Emotion in Service Design

In our Service Design class this week, we’re reading a paper on interaction design and service design by Stefan Holmlid, a researcher and educator at Linkoping University. The article was written to establish common ground and differentiation between disciplines to “create supportive structures” between them. Borrowing from a framework developed by Edeholt and Lowgren, Holmlid…

CapMetro app iteration

This week in our Rapid Ideation and Creative Problem Solving class, we are on our first iteration of wireframes for the improved CapMetro app, and in my case, my first experience with creating wireframes at all. To get from concept map to wireframes, we were asked to go through a process of taking the critique…

Financing Longer Life Expectancies in an Aging Population

“In 1940, the typical American who reached age 65 would ultimately spend about 17 percent of his or her life retired. Now the figure is 22 percent, and still rising.”[1] As life expectancy in America has increased (about 3 months each year since 1840)[1], so has the length in retirement, and attendant worries about financing…

User-centered sustainability

In our second quarter, we have begun to study Service Design. Our readings began with a chapter on “Convergence,” from Innovation X by Adam Richardson. One point raised in class was that some of Richardson’s arguments are from a business-oriented perspective, rather than a user-centered one. There are good reasons to present arguments from a…

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